Coronavirus (COVID-19) FAQ.

We are reeling from the changes happening in the world outside, as we know you are. We're thinking about the people out there who are anxious, homebound or sickā€”and all of your animals too. We're also working to continue to provide services where we can, including making sure that you have good and practical information about how this virus may impact you and your family, including its animal members.

For the most up to date information, please visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.

"Should I have a preparedness plan for my pet?

The HSUS urges everyone to have a preparedness plan in place. And, get the word out! Remind community members that having a plan for pets is critical; individuals who become sick or require hospitalization will need to have someone to take their animals. If you can, please endure the current situation from the safety of your own home.

Some steps to take include:

  • Identify a family member or friend who can care for pets if someone in the household becomes too ill to care for pets.
  • Have crates, food and extra supplies on hand for movement and relocation of pets if necessary.
  • Keep all animal vaccines up to date and have copies of those records available in the event that boarding becomes necessary.
  • Ensure that all medications are documented with dosages and administering directions. It's a good idea to include the prescription from your veterinarian with the medications and your pet's to-go bag.
  • Pets should have proper identification: a collar with ID tag and a microchip with current, up-to date contact information.

"Can my pet get COVID-19?"

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Organization for Animal Health have issued advisories saying there is no evidence at this time that companion animals can spread the COVID-19 virus. That being said, be alert. Just as we are social distancing and washing our hands, keep yourself and your pet by being alert.

  • Don't let other people touch your pets.
  • If you take your dog for a walk, be alert to other dogs, cats, squirrels, joggers, bikers, etc. that might startle or distract them. Keep your dog on a leash at all times and do not use flexi-leads.
  • Keep dangerous substances out of reach of pets to avoid the need for an emergency room visit.

"Where can I get help if my pet has medical needs?"

Emergency clinics are still open but overwhelmed like other essential businesses. Expect long waits and understand that they will most likely ask you to wait in the car while they take your pet inside for an examination and treatment.

If you are experiencing difficulty affording critical medical care for your pet, email flowersfund@humanetomorrow.org. As always, call your regular veterinarian with questions about your pet's health.

"Where can I get help if my pet has medical needs?"

Emergency clinics are still open but overwhelmed like other essential businesses. Expect long waits and understand that they will most likely ask you to wait in the car while they take your pet inside for an examination and treatment.

If you are experiencing difficulty affording critical medical care for your pet, email flowersfund@humanetomorrow.org.

As always, call your regular veterinarian with questions about your pet's health.